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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 566 (some duplicates have been removed)
portion of the program will be moderated by a professor geoffrey hazard, a distinguished professor of law at uc hastings. the professor is a leading expert in the field of civil procedure of legal ethics and is good at asking questions. it is my pleasure to introduce our very special guest, stephen zack, president of the american bar association. with nearly 400,000 members, it is the largest volunteer professional membership organization in the world. mr. zack is the first hispanic american to serve as the president and the second to be born abroad. he was only 14 when his family emigrated from cuba under harrowing circumstances, including last minute detention by the secret police. he made it here. in two lines -- and two lines come to mind when i think of him. "this is my country, land of my choice. this is my country, here i found voice." what a voice it is. he earned his aba at the university of florida and he is now in their hall of fame. he is a partner in the miami office of the national law firm. his clients range from former vice president al gore to philip morris, to the nation
a federal laws if they are prohibited from enforcing federal immigration laws. they don't certainly want to enforce federal laws they deemed to be unconstitutional. oregon sheriff tim mueller says it is all about the second amendment. he joins us next. executive orders, executive actions. this president's actions on the second amendment constitution. attorneys join us to argue the issues and the cnstitution. issues and the cnstitution. the. are you flo? yes. is this the thing you ga my husband? well, yeah, yes. the "name your price" tool. you tell us the price you want to pay, and we give you a range of options to choose from. careful, though -- that kind of power can go to your head. that explains a lot. yo, buddy! i got this. gimme one, gimme one, gimme one! the power of the "name your price" tool. only from progressive. ♪ lou: well, the algerian government reportedly rejected offers of help from the united states and european powers, and there are also reports that they rejected a request by the white house to be extraordinarily careful and cautious in dealing with the hosta
.s. history that have transformed the laws of the country and illuminated protections afforded to religion in the u.s. constitution. this interview, part of booktv's college series, was recorded at the university of pennsylvania in philadelphia. it's about 20 minutes. >> host: university of pennsylvania professor sarah gordon, "the spirit of the law" is her most recent book. what do you mean when you talk about the old constitutional world and the new constitutional world when it comes to religion? >> guest: well, for most of our nation's history, it was the states rather than federal government that controlled access to religious worship, the rights of religious organizations and so on. and in the early decades of the 20th century, that began to shift as the supreme court applied the national constitutional establishment and free exercise clauses of the first amendment against the states sort of centralizing debates about religion. >> host: but if the states had the control, we had it written into our constitution, freedom of religion. >> guest: we did, indeed. but the first amendment beg
cases against that school discipline, but holly has come up with a really wonderful solution within law enforcement that we would love you to talk about and it's preventive and solution. >> thank you. it's not going to be a shock to you that i don't have a sizzle reel but i did manage to get a few powerpoint slides in so it's a good thing if i can get my next one. can you advance it for me please? so it is a safety course that i created with yahoo. we partnered together. i started asking questions the first day so my boots are on the ground and i'm in the schools and i love doing what i do, and i believe wholeheartedly and i believe it was the soft power -- yes, i love it. i think it's effective in so many ways, so i had luckily teamed up with the right people at yahoo who were really amazing and just the foresight they saw, and believed in the concept that law enforcement needs to be a piece of this puzzle and have some solutions. we have a unique part in the schools and with kids and this did get certified for the peace officer standards and we get credit for that being police
a more abundant california. as legislators, it's your duty and privilege to pass laws. what we need to do for our future will require producing hundreds of new laws each year. the great writer of the 16th century wisely wrote, there is little relation between our actions, which are in perpetball mutation. the most desirable laws are the rarest, simplest and most general. think it would be better to have none at all than in such numbers as we have. constantly expanding the coercive power of government by adding each year so many minute prescriptions to detailed legal system overshadows other aspects of public service. individual creativity and direct leadership must also play a part. we do this not by commanding thou shall or thou shall not but to organize people. lay the ten commandments next to the education code and you'll see how far we diverged in approaching content to that forms the basis of our legal system. in the right order of things, education, the early fashioning of character and the formation of conscience, comes before legislation. nothing is more determinant of our future
and you'll hear from our studio audience, a former law enforcement official, gun rights activists who know firsthand why so many americans have chosen to arm themselves in order to protect their families. first, let's recap what was proposed earlier this we thiek. in addition, the president outlined legislative proposals and calling for the passage of a universal background check, something that critics say could lead to a gun ordinance data base and wants the assault weapons ban reinstated, an a ten round limit on magazines, and restrictions on bullets that can be possessed and manufactured and discussed a new gun trafficking law that penalizes those who help criminals obtain firearms, on wednesday, the americans called on americans to pressure their ehe lekted representatives in supporting these measures. let's take a look. >> get them on record, ask your member of congress if they support universal background checks to keep guns out of the wrong hands, ask if they support a ban on military style assault weapons and high capacity magazines, if they say no, ask them why not. ask them what
law enforcement official, gun rights activists who know firsthand why so many americans have chosen to arm themselves in order to protect their families. first, let's recap what was proposed earlier this we thiek. in addition, the president outlined legislative proposals and calling for the passage of a universal background check, something that critics say could lead to a gun ordinance data base and wants the assault weapons ban reinstated, an a ten round limit on magazines, and restrictions on bullets that can be possessed and manufactured and discussed a new gun trafficking law that penalizes those who help criminals obtain firearms, on wednesday, the americans called on americans to pressure their ehe lekted representatives in supporting these measures. let's take a look. >> get them on record, ask your member of congress if they support universal background checks to keep guns out of the wrong hands, ask if they support a ban on military style assault weapons and high capacity magazines, if they say no, ask them why not. ask them what's more important, doing whatever it takes t
ability to say, did you actually choose that and did you choose it in a way that the law would recognize. so the law all of the time develops concepts that scientists are interested in studying. it might be competency, for example. well, competency is really a multifaceted construct from a legal perspective. it could be competency to be executed, it could be competency to commit a crime. it could be competency to contribute to the decision as to whether voluntarily commit yourself to a mental hospital. it could be competency to participate in an abortion decision. so competency means many different things. the first thing you have to do as a scientist is ask the question, well, what does the law mean by it because if you want me to measure it, i have to somehow apply it. so going back to the question of free will, because a scientist can't operationally define it, they can't measure it, they're not really that much use to legal debates about free will. now, what does it mean on the legal side? i actually think the idea of free will or what is often referred to as volitional control plays
like anyone else under the law. for if we are truly created equal, then surely the love we commit to unanother must be equal, as well. our journey is not complete until we find a better way to welcome the striving, hopeful immigrants who still see america as a land of opportunity. until bright, young students and engineers are listed in our workforce rather than expelled from our country. we know that america thrives when every person can find independence and pride in their work. when the wages of honest labor liberate families from the brink of hardship. we are true to our creed when a little girl born in to the bleakest poverty knows that she has the same chance to succeed as anybody else. >> and joining me now with his reaction to the president's speech yesterday, democratic congressman from maryland, chris van hollen. thank you so much for your time. >> it's great to be with you, tamron. >> as have perhaps read yourself or heard "the new york times" is calling the president's unapologetic, evolved. we ask the question, is this the liberal reagan? what is your thoughts on this
collaboration, communes case and experience of all of members of our community, teachers, law enforcement, and the affected families will work to make our schools safer, stronger, and more united. that's why we're here today to prevent another sandy hook. we all have to work together to end gun violence. i hope we can continue that conversation today and make our children safer. thank you. >> i would like to thank our leader and co-chair for this honor. we come to this room today from different places and many different backgrounds. the last few months we have seen too many of our fellow countrymen gunned down in the streets. i represent camden, new jersey. a city of 80,000 have had 70 homicides this year. we see our neighbors die in shopping malls, movie theaters, college campuses and horrifically 31 days ago an elementary school. we are bonded together by one common conviction and that is our belief that is not inevitable. we can make choices to stop this from happening again. we believe that consistent with good medical practice, we can improve our mental health system so those who are
coming together of law enforcement, educators and industry and a variety of other folks and nonprofits organizations and really understand the issue and dive into it. it's been awesome and a ton of learning has gone into this. alice is amazing. everything that happened with time warner and got together a year ago and partnered up on this and wouldn't it be great if we got two major media organizations together, one traditional media which has a a lot of strength in eaching people via tv and one reaching people socially and if you could gather these together imagine what we can do? and so i think you called sizzle real. it was a sizzling experience to be in a high school in hare land and felt like a football pep rally but it was about bullying and they all took the pledge to stop it when they see it and amazing experience and tip of the hat to time warner to really understanding the issue and putting the weight of the media empire behind it to reach people, and second of all understanding how you sort -- there is the bully and there is the person being bullied but what if we got the
the federal law they're much more common in the state's that don't do much of the gun shows and in the state's generating some publicity i heard that open air market that i've shown you pictures of have basically closed with the promoter saying you can't sell guns there so i went back and this time shooting the video from the united corps but indeed they have absolutely no gun sales but everybody has congregated about 150 feet up against the building. he was relocated about a 32nd flock. the other thing that happened, and jamie was kind enough to mention they were kind of winding down the office in the city of new york sent a team of private detectives out and we talked to cameras and we talked on how to try to avoid detection and talked about some gun shows we might want to go to. i had one guy walking around with a camera and these guys were pros. the allies and the years of engagement that said you can't talk to anybody but they were not so hampered and the shot a video and i'm going to show it to you. >> i'm going to let this speak for itself. >> i need to see your id. >> no background c
suspension of the tobacco sales permit. the reason for suspension, violation of state law and the san francisco health code which proprohibit the indoor smoking of tobacco products. director's case no. smk12-09 and we'll start with the appellant. you have seven minutes >> good evening, my name is bashir shahin, the owner of marrakech restaurant. thank you to the board of appeals for giving us a chance to express our thoughts and feelings. i am not here to argue or ask for anything unreasonable. just hoping that you will give us some leniency andtry to give us some mercy on this case, which is a small family business, trying to keep our doors open. we have been in business for the last 16 years. i have clean record with all departments. for the last few years we have been hit very hard by the recession and economy and it's been hard to keep our doors as well. we like to comply with the ordinance, with any laws that come through. just this particular matter is kind of confusing and that is why we got into this argument. and we're hoping to resolve it and get better results from this.
of supervisors and signed into law by the mayor. these groups say by authority of law we demand transparency and accountability and for that reason we're disappointed we were not notified of the report being issued today. indeed we found about it a couple of days ago by happenstance. we are shocked by the lack of substance. when members met with the chief in 2012 he assured us he would include information which we outlined in a letter sent to him on june 8, and to address another question that was presented by commissioner several meetings happened with the chief and staff happened in july and september and after the signing of the ordinance. in short we are disappointed that despite the verbal assurances this report failed to include anymore any useful information regarding the work and this lack of information makes it impossible for the public to have true accountability to know what the police department is doing with regard to this issue. a five minute presentation is not sufficient to that and my colleague will speak on the details of this. thank you. >> thank you. >> thank you m
. amendments and they need to be [applause] all across the country, law enforcement and the public are calling upon congress to strengthen our nation's laws. i ask you he our call and enact these sensible measures that will prevent further bloodshed. thank you. [applause] >> thank you all very much for what has been a most extraordinary, a powerful testimony. and prescriptions for us to take back and thank you for giving us the strength and the resolve to help make these changes. we cannot do it without you. i think you know we hope you know we are with you in trying to make these changes. we are now going to move to questions. i will introduce my colleague, mike thompson. a member of one of his vice chairs on the violence committee. we will have a one minute question and that will be when we get to dealing with our members. >> thank you. it gives me great pleasure to introduce one of the vice chairs on the task force to prevent violence. an expert in juvenile justice. our colleague from california in juvenile justice, and our and gentleman from virginia. mr. bobby scott. already had recommend
oath of office. our witnesses hail from every walk of life, education, academia, law enforcement, and public service. we are stroorl grateful to have with us, dr. janet robinson, superintendent of schools of newtown, connecticut. dr. emily nottingham, mother of gabe zimmerman, all of you may know was the victim in tucson nearly two years ago. chief scott knight, police department from minnesota to give us a school from middle america, from rural areas. and mayor michael nutter, president of the u.s. conference of mayors who has been a leader on this issue for a very long time. your voices and your contributions are playing a critical role in our effort to take these long overdue actions. we look forward to hearing your ideas and testimony and answering the call to action on gun violence prevention. we are especially pleased to be doing so on a day when our president, as we continue to mourn with the families of newtown, has told us that the time for action is now. we must do everything in our power to stop such terrifying violence in the future. we recognize these challenges are
rights trumped, this new criminal law. and unfortunately, they prevailed. now, i don't think congress when it passed the federal communications decency act meant to allow companies to with kind of knowing disregard for the effects of their practices to enable this. but this is the challenge we face still and that we're preempted from the field. so we're going to try to go back again and work on this. backpage.com makes millions of dollars a year off of this practice. it's one of their primary practices s escort advertising, and they refuse to stop it. other online advertising companies that have this practice don't have the same problem. that's what my police department reports to me. the next step we're taking in seattle is we're going to have a conference of mayors up and down the i-5 corridor because what we know is these young women are brought from town to town. seattle police department studied this, and they tracked one phone number, all right, that was being advertised. and, again, we don't know whether it was underage or not, but neither does back page. and of course it was i
and we decided that we would call it seth's law in honor of her, she had been in and around sacramento for a long time. so the legislation in and of itself, i don't think it's going to work miracles, but it is definitely on people's radar now and i think you hear it in the media more and more. the reason we have a suicide barrier and the reason we are having legislation like this is because of the parents and the families because they are the ones that hurt the most and i would imagine part of the therapeutic thing, you've got to tell this story and telling it in the right place and the right time can be very effective. so seth's law does require that if you witness an act of bullying, that you must report it. >> is that for anybody? >> anyone, but particularly teachers. there is a -- sometimes we see things that aren't very pleasant and if you've ever taken it to muni, you know what i mean. your tendency is to turn away. i heard the word faggot on the play ground when i taught. the teachers were intimidated, they didn't want to be seen to have any empathy because that might refle
. because the law is clear. before any hearing is conducted under this section, section 19-{^21} you shall provide permitee at least 20 days written notice. permitee only got 12 days. back to this document, you will see again, she was cited under section 19-21. let's keep looking at this document. failure -- down here in red ink says, "failure to appear may result in -- they have two boxes here. the second box is suspension, revocation of your permit to operate the above referenced site. the box is unchecked. you may have read in the respondent's supplemental brief. secondly, you will look at allowing illegal activity to occur on the premises. no reference. usually they might incorporate by reference, but there is no specified illegal activity. and then you see the notice of hearings, particularly in the massage business. most of the people are first-generation americans, with what they call with language problems. they have difficultis with the english language. english is a second language. how are they supposed to interpret this? are they lawyers? i have appeared on these and every
and the gentleman talking about going through law school in the '70s and i can relate to that experience going through night school. having a hard time trying to stay awake during procedures class. i recall a professor making key points and one thing he always said, you should always examine the issue of jurisdiction. i have two primary points on that issue. today as indicated or foreshadowed by brief the appellant decided to file an exemption and declare that they are going to be bond on the jurisdiction of the state of california. the california massage therapy council. i have that, if you could bring up the projector, please? it was filed today. >> what is this document sorry, i missed what you said it was. >> it's entitled -- this first one -- there is two of them. i'm sorry. for a state certified massage establishment. as you can see it's in order and has been received by environmental health section. there is also -- this actually goes to the planning department, but you file it through the health department. there is also a companion document entitled "declaration of exemption f
donkey, or lack thereof. i love the picture. it reminded me of a priceless letter he sent to me in law school when he was over there in the peace corps. chris wrote wonderful notes and told me when he went running in the village where he was staying, only to have locals come up beside him and say where is it, where did it go. where is what? your donkey. i don't have a donkey. >> why are you running? [ laughter] >> for exercise. >> exercise? are you nuts? if you want exercise, come work on my orchard, you crazy american. >> chris succeeded because he knew how to laugh at himself and relate to people around him. there are two more memories i want to share. one deals with government and jazz. chris always wanted to work for the state department. he always wanted to be involved in the foreign service. he took the foreign service exam when we were undergrads at cal. he came back the first time, pleased with results on the written but felt he didn't do so well on the orals. the question that seemed to trip him up and left him perplexed was the following. mr. stevens, please compare american
particular case whether a person is an automoton, usually you can. the law has a bright line. it says if you engage in a wongful action, there is a defense called the insanity defense which never works as most of us know because we don't recognize it. should we recognize it, that's an interesting question. should we have a more robust concept of diminished responsibility in light of the understanding that some people have less control over their preferences and desires or should we have better sentencing schemes or get rid of incarceration and come up with different models of trying to deal with punishment once we understand people have wrong selections. i think those are all interesting questions, but is there free will? well, the fact that almost everybody in the audience raised either their right or left hand contemplated it and were quickly able to act and respond. that to me says, yes, there is. now what do we want to do about it? now that we understand that those of us in the audience or up here that like chocolate cake may not have control over it, how do we want to account for that i
with the review of the department general order log which is a law with basic details, not a lot of activities that and i want to thank lieutenant gracie that went out of her way to meet the commissioners and we get a chance to review it and i appreciate that and it's done regally and i want to recognize the department's work in doing that. also we received a letter about meetings with the community and wondered if the chief wanted to give some comment on that. looks like there was a meeting in june. >> i think these were the meetings that preceded the ordinance. >> okay thank you. >> any further questions? dr. marshall. >> just because i heard this come up before and i want to reiterate what you said and what commissioner mazzucco said regarding this issue the chief said a number of times in public. i don't know how many times you need to say it chief. he stated how officers are handled with this issue. i just want the public to be reassured when the chief says that's the way it is that's the way it is. >> okay. thank you. >> thank you. oh public comment. >> we're still going on presenta
of the tools they need to help reduce gun violence. >> bill: outgauge in progun circles about a possible law compelling medical people to ask some americans about gun ownership. we'll get to the bottom of that. >> the more i think about it, the more it seems that colin powell's appearance on meet the press was well coordinated with the white house. charges by laura ingraham by powell and others played the race card at the behest of president obama. ms. ingraham will be here. caution, you are about to enter the no spin zone, the factor begins right now. >> bill: hi, i'm i'm bill o'reilly. thanks for watching us tonight. evil on the internet. that is the subject of this evening's talking points memo. whether we know it or not all of us are being influenced by the net. the machines have changed everything in our lives. 245 million americans three quarters of the population have access to the net. worldwide 2.4 billion people have net capability. a third of the world's population. and as you know, if you use the internet, there is a tremendous evil available at your finger tips. pedophilia, drug
to discuss ways to prevent gun violence. later, bob goodlatte talks about his opposition to new gun laws. >> president obama launched his effort to reduce gun violence wednesday, calling for action and don't congress and signed in 23 consecutive quarters to deal with the issue. speaking before an audience that included the families of those killed in last month's newtown shooting, the president called for an assault weapons ban, better background checks, and more funding for police and mental health services. this is 25 minutes. >> ladies and gentlemen, the president and vice-president of the united states. >> please, please be seated. thank you. before -- before i begin today, let me say to the families of the innocence that died, our hearts go out to you and you incredible courage being here and the president and i will do everything in our power to honor the memory of your children and your wives with the work we take up here today. it's been 33 days since the nation's heart was broken by the horrific, senseless violence that took place at sandy hook elementary school. 20 -- 20 beauti
rulemaking to make law enforcement the ability to run a full background check on an individual before returning a seized the gun. published a letter from the bureau of alcohol, tobacco, firearms and explosives to federally licensed gun dealers providing guidance on how to run background checks for private sellers. launch a national safe and responsible gun ownership campaign. review safety standards for gun locks and gun saves. issue a presidential memorandum to require federal law enforcement to trace guns recovered in criminal investigations. we will read more of those as the go through this morning. gun owners only for the first segment. this call is from connecticut. good morning. caller: good morning. how're you doing. i think like all politicians, he is muddying the waters. mr. obama is doing something totally unconstitutional to begin with. that is neither here nor there. the government has gotten so large and so big, they are involving themselves in everything not important to the average citizen. it is my opinion that what we need to do is to stop all of the stuff the governm
organization that you trust is going to give you real information and support the kinds of laws that they're supporting rather than one that's maybe a bill posed by the industry that, guess what, wants to be self-regulating. okay, so now we are moving to the driveway, and this is really interesting because we think about low emissions cars as being really important for maybe climate change but they also might be important for breast cancer because when fuel is burning and you guys are familiar with chemicals that, you know, come bust, lower emissions vehicle, one that's more efficient may reduce these pah's in our air and especially in urban areas reduce exposures to those compounds which is really pornts, so thinking about hybrid or electric, we're all lucky enough to take public transit and reduce those overall exposures or -- yeah? >> i believe so, is that true? yes, my science advisors, that's why they're here. >> [inaudible]. >> yeah. there are a lot of carcinogens in diesel exhaust, yeah. >> [inaudible]. >> well, you're still seeing an oil that combusts, some of them we know burn m
with local law enforcement who had gone into schools talking about bullying, including cyber bullying and giving people concrete examples of things of situations they saw, it was remarkable. and that is why we will continue to do that work. so i hope today as we move forward you will understand that we are in this together with you at the department of justice. this is an all hands on deck enterprise. there is so much to do. i hope at the end of this day we will indeed all follow the lead of that student, walk out and say what are one or two things i'm going to do differently and better? how are we going to improve this situation? i hope if you take one and only one thing from melinda and my and ruslyn's remarks today, if you have an idea, please bring them to us. we want to learn from you. we are in this together and i want to say thank you because the most important thing we have is a recognition that you understand that this is indeed a national issue for us to deal with. i'm looking forward to the rest of the day, i appreciate your presence and i appreciate your leadership
a proposed law that would reduce felony drug possession crimes to a misdemeanor. this is what 13 states have done. we not only bring these issues to the forefront, but have the opportunity to participate -- and we have cards that you could fill out and questions. this promises to be a year of reform and change like we have never seen, and we now see prisoner reentry programs being implemented. we're still spending too much money and resources and not enough on rehabilitation and reentry. this november, the voters will decide on limiting the three strikes law. issues and measures long overdue. it is clear there is much more that needs to be done. according to a study that was published this month -- since 1989, 2000 people have been wrongfully incarcerated and they served collectively, 10,000 years. an average of 11 years person. i would like to thank the people who made this summit possible. memoranda -- amy devon -- many volunteers and all of our speakers and panelists. i would like to thank the co- sponsors, and the bar association of san francisco. i would like to thank them for their hel
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 566 (some duplicates have been removed)